Short-Term Rental Regulations in San Antonio, TX 2018-05-24T11:30:01+00:00

Short-Term Rental Regulations in San Antonio, TX

Short-Term Rental Regulations in San Antonio, TX

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San Antonio, officially the City of San Antonio, is the seventh most populous city in the United States and the second most populous city in both Texas and the Southern United States. Founded as a Spanish mission and colonial outpost in 1718, the city became the first chartered civil settlement in Texas in 1731, making it the state’s oldest municipality. The city’s deep history is contrasted with its rapid growth: it was the fastest-growing of the top ten largest cities in the United States from 2000 to 2010, and the second from 1990 to 2000. Straddling the regional divide between South and Central Texas, San Antonio anchors the southwestern corner of an urban megaregion colloquially known as the “Texas Triangle”.

Short-Term Regulations in San Antonio, TX – Short-term vacation rentals in San Antonio are here to stay, but the city faces a tough task in trying to encourage the positives of this growing industry while balancing the interests of residential neighborhoods.

To explore the issue, the city put together a 26-person task force — neighborhood association members, short-term rental operators, and representatives from associated industries — that has been working on proposals for six months.

The rules for short-term rentals (defined as rentals of less than 30 consecutive days) so far include:

  • Operators would be required to get city-issued short-term rental permits, which would be valid for three years.
  • Online or other advertisements of short-term rental properties would be required to include the rental permit number.
  • Operators would be required to post information for guests within rentals, outlining rules and restrictions and including a 24-hour contact person and phone number.
  • The city is also considering density requirements, rezoning, or special permitting.

Some of the proposed rules address residents’ concerns that allowing short-term rentals will replace long-term residents in neighborhoods with absentee landlords and transient visitors. However, according to Airbnb, most of its hosts in San Antonio live on the properties they’re offering up for rent.

Under the proposal, those who break the short-term rental laws could face the loss of their permit and fines of up to $500 per day.

San Antonio vacation rental operators are already required to collect a total hotel occupancy tax (HOT) of 16.75 percent for rentals of less than 30 days. That includes a 6 percent state lodging tax, 9 percent San Antonio city lodging tax (comprised of a 7 percent general occupancy tax and an additional 2 percent Convention Center expansion tax), and 1.75 Bexar County lodging tax.

Since May of this year, Airbnb has automatically collected the 6 percent state tax for its Texas bookings. However, Airbnb does not collect any other local lodging taxes, so San Antonio Airbnb hosts must collect the remaining 10.75 percent in lodging taxes from guests themselves and file them with the city. Short-term rental operators listing their properties on other platforms such as VRBO or HomeAway need to be aware that those platforms do not collect any lodging taxes on their behalf — in which case they remain wholly responsible for collecting and filing lodging taxes on bookings earned through these sites.

Airbnb collected nearly $4.5 million in Texas HOT taxes between May 1 and Aug. 31. As part of the deal between Airbnb and Texas, the state Comptrollers’ Office agreed to waive any state back taxes for Airbnb hosts.

According to data collector AirDNA, more than 1,700 San Antonio properties are actively offering short-term rentals on Airbnb. Meanwhile, city officials estimate that only 200 properties are currently paying lodging taxes. By some estimates, the city could be collecting $100,000 more each month if all short-term vacation rentals were paying their lodging taxes.

San Antonio’s short-term rental task force is expected to make its final recommendations to the city soon. While several steps remain before any of the proposals are made into law, San Antonio short-term rental operators need to be prepared for more regulation and responsibility.

Link to the  San Antonio Short Term rental laws
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Article Sources:

SHORT TERM RENTALS REGULATION & LICENSING

https://docsonline.sanantonio.gov/FileUploads/dsd/ShortTermRentalDRAFTOrdinance.pdf

SUMMARY OF REGULATION

SAN ANTONIO SUMMARY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Antonio

Short-Term Rental Regulations in San Antonio, TX

Posted By Noah Goldfeder

Marketing Team
Posted: Thursday April 20th 2018

Short-Term Rental Regulations in San Antonio, TX

Posted By Noah Goldfeder

Marketing Team
Posted: Thursday April 20th 2018

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Disclaimer: We cannot guarantee the accuracy of these regulations. They change on a regular basis. While we regularly update each location as often as we can and check for accuracy, we still encourage you to do your own research. If you find an error, an omission, or something that needs an update, please report it with our submission form or leave a comment directly on the page.
Disclaimer: We cannot guarantee the accuracy of these regulations. They change on a regular basis. While we regularly update each location as often as we can and check for accuracy, we still encourage you to do your own research. If you find an error, an omission, or something that needs an update, please report it with our submission form or leave a comment directly on the page.

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